Pastor Doyle Theimer, Christ the King Lutheran

Pastor Doyle Theimer, Christ the King Lutheran

What if the Christians—the ones who truly followed the way and teachings of Jesus—had early on taken to the streets to protest the Nazi movement? Would it have made a difference? We’ll never know, because they didn’t. But if it had been me, as much as I would have felt the nudge of God’s Spirit to take action, most likely I would have held back because of fear. The interesting thing is that what holds me back the most is the very ordinary fear of uncertainty. How does one go about mounting a protest? How do you talk about these kinds of things? Where do you find like-minded persons, so that you are not alone? To me the Holocaust March of Remembrance is an answer to such questions. Perhaps it is not too early in our own day to make these visible public statements against resurgent anti-Semitism. But it is never too early to have a fire drill, because knowing what to do in a crisis takes advance preparation and practice because we never know when the crisis might happen. This March of Remembrance is that kind of practice and preparation. It creates networks of people who are willing to stand together and to move in the direction of justice and compassion. It gives us practice in organizing. It helps us find words to express timeless truths in need of timely reminders. This is why I am a part of the 2015 Kingwood March of Remembrance—it’s God’s call to me to start repenting from standing idly by.

Pastor Doyle Theimer, Christ the King Lutheran

March of Remembrance Texas
2019-09-18T09:07:45-05:00

Pastor Doyle Theimer, Christ the King Lutheran

What if the Christians—the ones who truly followed the way and teachings of Jesus—had early on taken to the streets to protest the Nazi movement? Would it have made a difference? We’ll never know, because they didn’t. But if it had been me, as much as I would have felt the nudge of God’s Spirit to take action, most likely I would have held back because of fear. The interesting thing is that what holds me back the most is the very ordinary fear of uncertainty. How does one go about mounting a protest? How do you talk about these kinds of things? Where do you find like-minded persons, so that you are not alone? To me the Holocaust March of Remembrance is an answer to such questions. Perhaps it is not too early in our own day to make these visible public statements against resurgent anti-Semitism. But it is never too early to have a fire drill, because knowing what to do in a crisis takes advance preparation and practice because we never know when the crisis might happen. This March of Remembrance is that kind of practice and preparation. It creates networks of people who are willing to stand together and to move in the direction of justice and compassion. It gives us practice in organizing. It helps us find words to express timeless truths in need of timely reminders. This is why I am a part of the 2015 Kingwood March of Remembrance—it’s God’s call to me to start repenting from standing idly by.